How Introverts Manage Stress

by | Oct 12, 2020 | Awareness, Blog Post, Blog Post | 0 comments

Renowned Swiss psychiatrist and the founder of Analytic Psychology Carl Jung described Introversion as an attitude type where one applies their ‘horme’ chiefly to themselves. ‘Horme’ is the Greek spirit that personifies impulse, effort, and eagerness to do something. That is quite different from the modern-day theory and use of the term. Modern-day theorists define Introversion and Extroversion primarily by personality and behaviorist traits of a person judging on how outgoing, friendly, and sociable they are.

It is considered that introverts direct their energy inwards; they find peace in solidarity and mulling in their thoughts. They generally form the followers in a group which in turn, at times pushes them to do something they are uncomfortable with. Introverts are also known to be uneasy with confrontation. They find it difficult to express their feelings and think a lot before saying or doing anything. All these factors contribute to making them more prone to stress more than extroverts.

What propels stress in introverts?

One of the most nerve-wracking experiences for an introvert is when they are put under the spotlight- literally and metaphorically. The image of a bunch of people staring at them, waiting for them to say or do something is terrifying and stressful. Unlike extroverts, introverts find it taxing to network and speak to strangers.

One of the other primal factors that cause stress to introverts is an invasion of privacy. Introverts tend to have a very small group of close peers and prefer to have a deep interpersonal relationship with just them. When an outsider intrudes into their life or personal space, they find it difficult to deal with or communicate to.

What is stress like for introverts?

A few of the most common symptoms and effects of stress include headache, fatigue, stroke, increased heart rate, and fluctuating Blood Pressure. Studies show our bodies produce stress hormones like Adrenalin, Cortisol, and Epinephrine as a reaction to mental stress. These hormones not just affect our bodies cerebrally but also dampen our immune and cardiovascular systems. They are also known to impair a body’s fight or flight response.

 

Remedies to overcome stress:

 

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Communicate:

This might seem like a farfetched solution to an introvert who anyway faces issues expressing themselves, but it is one of the vital steps in intervening and managing stress. It is extremely important for anyone going through mental health issues to communicate and seek help. They must find a close aid – parents, siblings, friends, partners, colleagues- and express their discomfort.

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Safe space:

Introverts generally have a safe space- a corner in their house, an empty room, an open space- where they can physically go and be by themselves. It has been attested by many introverts that spending some alone time in their safe space instantly calms them down.

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Turn Off:

In today’s day and age, we all are constantly bombarded by information at every instant, thanks to internet and technology. That can be quiet besetting for someone already in stress. Occasionally taking a break and turning off from the virtual world tends to help one simmer down.

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Practice Postivity:

For many introverts suffering through chronic stress, a situation can push them into a deep wallow of negativity and insecurity. It is then extremely important for them to consciously practice and preach positivity. Willfully indulging in positive thoughts can help one recover from a stressful situation.

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Process:

It can be overwhelming for an introvert to understand and come to terms with new development. Change in any form is known to aggravate stress and that can be much more difficult for an introvert. It is important they take their time to process a new change internally and then reflect and act on it.

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Recreate:

Studies show that indulging in recreational activities and hobbies like swimming, gardening, playing sports, music, etc. often helps one revitalize. This can be tremendously helpful especially in the case of introverts who generally prefer to be by themselves.

When humans first invented Holidays (Holy-days), it was meant as a day to relax, enjoy, and rejuvenate. It is ironic that today, the same day causes stress and anxiety to so many people, especially the ones going through loneliness. It can be particularly difficult to stay adrift when everyone around us seems to be happy and we feel miserable inside. In times like this, we need to protect ourselves from our own imagination and cynicism. We need to curb the feeling of being wronged and unwanted and replenish ourselves with positive thoughts and motives. Nobody controls us but our minds.

What propels stress in introverts?

One of the most nerve-wracking experiences for an introvert is when they are put under the spotlight- literally and metaphorically. The image of a bunch of people staring at them, waiting for them to say or do something is terrifying and stressful. Unlike extroverts, introverts find it taxing to network and speak to strangers.

One of the other primal factors that cause stress to introverts is an invasion of privacy. Introverts tend to have a very small group of close peers and prefer to have a deep interpersonal relationship with just them. When an outsider intrudes into their life or personal space, they find it difficult to deal with or communicate to.

What is stress like for introverts?

A few of the most common symptoms and effects of stress include headache, fatigue, stroke, increased heart rate, and fluctuating Blood Pressure. Studies show our bodies produce stress hormones like Adrenalin, Cortisol, and Epinephrine as a reaction to mental stress. These hormones not just affect our bodies cerebrally but also dampen our immune and cardiovascular systems. They are also known to impair a body’s fight or flight response.

 

Precautionary Measures:

Albeit there are fixes and cures for when a person has had a stress attack, one can take a few precautionary measures to steer clear and avoid extreme stress. These practices not just help a person stave off stress but also have a healthy and comprehensive lifestyle.

 

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Preparation:

Preparedness always helps us navigate anything and more so in things that are uncomfortable territory. Planning and preparing anything in advance helps an introvert not just execute a task comfortably but also be mentally prepared in facing a situation.

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Know your limits:

Introverts are generally led by the extroverts. In those times, they find it hard to convey that they are exhausted or disinterested in doing something and push themselves into suffering in silence leading to stress and anxiety. Introverts must know their limits and try & communicate that to their peers.

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Meditation and yoga:

For ages, we have been taught about the benefits of yoga and meditation. They are known to not just heal and cleanse our body but also mind. Regular practice of yoga and meditation can help us calm and destress ourselves.

What can one do to help an introvert experiencing stress?

As bystanders, it can be confusing so as to why someone gets stressed, what induces it, and what they can do to help.

  • Listen & pay attention
  • Give them their space
  • Help them snap back to reality, compassionately
  • Don’t judge them; they generally tend to see through and feel embarrassed
  • Suggest that they might need professional help
  • Offer pragmatic help (Emotional, financial, etc.)

If you observe the sport of Javelin Throw, you would see the athlete pulling the Javelin behind before finally launching it into the air. The pull induces the push, making the javelin go much beyond. We must treat the problems and challenges we face in our lives as that pull that helps us push ourselves to greater extents and potential. There is nothing stronger than our willpower. Only with a strong will, determination, and practical solutions, we can overcome stress and live a happy and healthy life.

 

*DISCLAIMER*

The following content is for information purposes only. We, in no way claim or assure that using the information can be a substitute for any kind of medical treatment if any. If you are diagnosed with any kind of medical/clinical condition please do not avoid visiting a professional.

ABOUT THE TENDER CURVE:

Our purpose is to spread positivity and motivation by focusing on self-love and self-care. We also work towards reducing the stigma around mental health and by creating mental health awareness through our blogs.

People today have forgotten how to be happy; they have forgotten what it is to be inspired what it to be real & motivated. We all are so busy with our daily lives today that we have forgotten to take time out for ourselves.  We are here to remind you that you are special in your own ways. We are here to remind you that it’s okay to not finish a task, or meet deadlines, its ok not to be ok! You deserve to be happy, you deserve to smile, you deserve to be cared for and loved.

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